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Over 100 quick stats and findings from an ever-growing body of research.

(Fernandez, Kuss, & Griffiths, 2020)
Even quitting porn for a short time can lessen its negative effects and have positive effects on consumers' lives and relationships.
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Fast Fact #11
(Rothman, Kaczmarsky, Burke, Jansen, & Baughman, 2015)
Research indicates that young people often feel pressured to imitate porn when having sex.
(Maddox, Rhoades, & Markman, 2011)
In comparison to couples who never viewed porn, a 2011 study found that those who watched porn alone reported twice the rate of cheating, and individuals who viewed porn alone and with their partners reported three times the rate of cheating.
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Fast Fact #42
(Maddox, Rhoades, & Markman, 2011)
Research has shown that those who don’t consume porn report higher relationship quality—on every measure— than those who viewed pornography alone.
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Fast Fact #41
(Love, Laier, Brand, Hatch, & Hajela, 2015; Gola, Wordecha, Sescousse, Lew-Starowicz, Kossowski, Wypych, Makeig, Potenza, & Marchewka, 2017)
There is an ever-growing body of research showing that pornography addiction is very real.
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Fast Fact #6
(Feehs & Wheeler, 2021)
83% of active 2020 sex trafficking cases involved online solicitation, which is overwhelmingly the most common tactic traffickers use to solicit sex buyers.
Citations
  • Feehs, K., & Wheeler, A. C. (2021). 2020 Federal Human Trafficking Report. Human Trafficking Institute. Retrieved from https://www.traffickinginstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/2020-Federal-Human-Trafficking-Report-Low-Res.pdf
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Fast Fact #104
(Wright, Paul, & Herbenick, 2021)
According to a nationally representative survey of U.S. teens, 84.4% of 14 to 18-year-old males and 57% of 14 to 18-year-old females have viewed pornography.
(Crosby & Twohig, 2016)
Problematic porn consumers who are treated using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy show a 92% reduction in porn consumption, and an 86% reduction three months later.
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Fast Fact #12
(Thorn, 2020)
According to a 2020 report, approximately 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 10 boys aged 13-17 report sharing their own nudes, despite the fact that those images are legally considered “child pornography”.
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Fast Fact #71
(Vera-Gray, McGlynn, Kureshi, & Butterby, 2021)
Research indicates that “hidden cam” videos are a common theme on porn sites, making it difficult to determine which videos are consensual and which are not.
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Fast Fact #89
(Young, 2013; Nathanson, 2021)
Research has demonstrated that overcoming a pornography habit is absolutely possible, and that over time, pornography’s negative effects can be managed and largely reversed.
Citations
  • Young K. S. (2013). Treatment outcomes using CBT-IA with Internet-addicted patients. Journal of behavioral addictions, 2(4), 209–215. https://doi.org/10.1556/JBA.2.2013.4.3
  • Nathanson, A. (2021). Psychotherapy with young people addicted to internet pornography. Psychoanal. Study Child, 74(1), 160-173. doi:10.1080/00797308.2020.1859286
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Fast Fact #10
(Martellozzo, Monaghan, Adler, Davidson, Leyva, & Horvath, 2016)
Of the adolescents who had been exposed to porn, 28% were first exposed by accident, 19% were unexpectedly shown pornography by someone else, and only 19% searched for it intentionally, according to research by the NSPCC.
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Fast Fact #24
(Malcolm & Naufal, 2016)
According to a 2016 study, people who view porn regularly are less likely to get married than those who do not. Researchers suggest this may be because consumers see porn as a substitute for sexual gratification in a relationship.
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Fast Fact #38