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5 Spooky Facts About Porn That Will Definitely Creep You Out

By October 13, 2020No Comments

When you think of scary stuff, what first comes to mind? If you’re like most people, you probably think of vampires, your phone battery at 1%, werewolves, or maybe zombies. Those are all terrifying enough, but here at Fight the New Drug, we know one thing stands out as being spookier than anything else:

Porn.

Now, before you exit this post, hear us out because we think you’ll want to read up on why porn is scarier than you might expect.

As you may know, the porn industry is estimated to be worth about $97 billion, more than the NFL, MLB, and NBA combined. That’s a big chunk of change, and they’re using all of that money to influence culture. Porn can damage relationships, it can re-wire consumers’ brains, and it can inflict some serious harm on society, too. So, while porn’s harmful effects may not seem to be as scary as Pennywise from “It,” we think that it’s pretty close.

Not convinced? Allow us to drop some facts that would make Count Dracula run for his coffin.

Skull And Dagger

1. Porn can turn people into walking zombies (…kind of)

Have you ever seen the movie, “I Am Legend?” It’s all about a fictional virus that infects nearly the entire world, basically turning everyone into zombies who have an appetite for human flesh that can never quite be satisfied.

Now, we’re not saying that watching porn is going to turn someone into a flesh-eating, walking zombie. Instead, it can push consumers toward a nearly-insatiable craving for more and more porn. Rather than driving them to eat human flesh, consuming pornography causes an individual to need a steadily increasing amount of pornography and objectified bodies to get the same “high” that they initially enjoyed.

Plus, the same content doesn’t do the trick after a while; more extreme content is needed.

Don't Buy The Lie - Black

2. Porn can (basically) control your mind

Sadly, the negative effects of porn impact millions of individuals around the world, leaving them struggling to cope with the depression and anxiety that so frequently accompany porn consumption. Such emotional difficulties can even include memory loss and focus issues. However, porn’s most powerful influence over your mind comes from its addictive nature.

See, your brain comes equipped with something called a “reward center.” [1] Its job is to motivate you to do things that protect and promote your survival—things like eating to stay alive or mating opportunities. [2] The way it rewards you for doing those things is by flooding your brain with dopamine and a cocktail of other “pleasure” chemicals each time you do. [3]

As frequent porn consumers become desensitized from repeated overloads of dopamine, they often find they can’t feel normal without a dopamine high. [4] Even other things that used to make them happy, like going out with friends or playing a favorite game, stop providing the same kind of enjoyment.

What began as a seemingly harmless habit can completely take over someone’s life— kind of like mind control. Spooky, right?

Consider Before Consuming

3. Like a vampire, porn can drain the love out of relationships

Not only does porn affect individuals, it also interferes with relationships and the love within them. Before we get into that, we’re going to dive into something a little bit gross: blood.

Blood is pretty important for living right? So, if you want to guarantee that you stay alive, what’s one thing that you should probably avoid? Vampires, of course. The bulk of folklore and mythology agree that vampires are basically the number one culprit of draining blood out of living things.

So just like blood is important to keeping you alive, love is important to keeping your relationships alive. If you want to guarantee that your relationships stay strong and healthy, can you guess a big thing that won’t help? You got it—porn.

The bulk of scientific research, facts, and personal accounts agree that porn can drain the love out of your relationships, leaving both parties miserable, hurting, and empty. [5] [6] [7]

Related: How Couples Who Choose To Fight Porn Together Can Become Stronger

Sadly, garlic isn’t as effective at warding off porn as it is vampires. There are, however, some steps that you can take to ensure that porn won’t get in between you and your significant other. Complete honesty and open communication can do wonders for keeping porn out of your relationship, and in some cases, they can also help heal your relationship from porn’s effects.

If you need extra help, we would recommend you check out our friends at Fortify and Bloom.

Fortify

4. The porn industry is basically Jekyll and Hyde

You’ve heard the story of Jekyll and Hyde, right? If you haven’t, it essentially involves a man with two separate identities. The first, Dr. Jekyll, is a personable scientist who works hard to hide his second identity, Mr. Hyde—a much more sinister, violent individual, who gets into all kinds of mischief. He’s able to maintain both personalities for a period of time, but the people around him eventually find out about the secrets he has been hiding.

The porn industry is trying to pull a similar trick over society, and they are doing their best to keep from being exposed as the “Mr. Hyde” they really are. They eagerly virtue-signal their involvement in causes such as “Clean the Beach” campaigns, “Save Pandas, Make Porn” gimmicks, and anti-domestic abuse initiatives, while they are hoping that we miss the massive amounts of societal harm they inflict through their involvement with human trafficking, filmed sexual abuse, [8] and profiting from compulsive behaviors and addiction.

Porn industry, we know your secrets—you can’t hide the Mr. Hyde you really are anymore.

Be A Lover And A Fighter - Retro

5. Porn contributes to the enslavement of thousands of individuals

Let’s focus on porn’s largest, global impact on society—its role in the sex trafficking epidemic that is sweeping the globe like an epidemic.

The average consumer, likely exposed before the age of 18, has no idea what exactly goes into the production of a single pornographic image or video. They might not even think about how or why a performer got to be on camera. If someone contributed even one, or a substantial amount, of the 42 billion visits to the world’s most popular free porn site last year, they probably don’t understand the likelihood that they might be looking at a performer who didn’t appear on film under their own free will.

That’s right. Porn and sex trafficking are inseparably linked, though much of society denies this fact.

This is the reality of what the porn industry fuels: real people being sexually abused and exploited at the hands of family members, traffickers, and pimps. Or, even established porn performers being pushed way past what they feel comfortable or have consented to do. Each click to porn content directly fuels the demand for sex traffickers to make money by selling videos of their sex slaves to porn sites.  But what about major porn studios and porn sites—aren’t they completely separate from the sex trafficking issue?

Absolutely not.

After all, when someone is sex trafficked, there are undoubtedly videos and images taken of them to advertise them online, if nothing else. But sometimes, these images and videos end up on popular sites or in commercial content, and there’s no real way for a consumer to tell what is consensual imagery, and what isn’t. The more the mainstream adult entertainment industry flourishes, the bigger the demand for deadly extreme porn becomes, and the larger the opposing globalized black market for porn will become.

People Are Not Products - White

No treats, only tricks

During Halloween, it can be fun to dress up, get scared, and have a good time. But as scary as haunted houses and horror movies can be, the nightmares end when November 1st comes around. However, the same can not be said for those struggling with the harmful effects of porn.

For them, the nightmares continue.

This is why we must continue to fight—for those working to overcome an addiction, for those who have seen their relationships crumble, and for those trapped in sex trafficking. We fight for you.

Porn may seem like a nice treat, but, in reality, it’s a dangerous trick. Don’t fall for it.

Citations

[1] National Institute On Drug Abuse: The Reward Pathway. (2016). Retrieved From Http://Www.Drugabuse.Gov/Publications/Teaching-Packets/Understanding-Drug-Abuse-Addiction/Section-I/4-Reward-Pathway; Volkow, N. D., & Morales, M. (2015). The Brain On Drugs: From Reward To Addiction. Cell, 162 (8), 712-725. Doi:10.1016/J.Cell.2015.07.046; Pitchers, K. K., Et Al. (2013). Natural And Drug Rewards Act On Common Neural Plasticity Mechanisms With DeltaFosB As A Key Mediator. Journal Of Neuroscience, 33 (8), 3434-3442. Doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4881-12.2013
[2] Berridge, K. C., & Robinson, T. E. (2016). Liking, Wanting, And The Incentive-Sensitization Theory Of Addiction. American Psychologist, 71(8), 670-679. Doi:10.1037/Amp0000059; Berridge, K.C., & Kringelbach, M. L. (2015). Pleasure Systems In The Brain. Neuron, 86, 646-664. Doi:10.1016/J.Neuron.2015.02.018; Paul, P. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, And Our Families. (75) New York: Henry Hold And Co.; Hyman, S. E. (2005). Addiction: A Disease Of Learning And Memory. American Journal Of Psychiatry, 162(8), 1414-1422.
[3] Volkow, N. D., & Morales, M. (2015). The Brain On Drugs: From Reward To Addiction. Cell, 162 (8), 713. Doi:10.1016/J.Cell.2015.07.046
[4] Volkow, N. D., Koob, G. F., & McLellan, A. T. (2016). Neurobiological Advances From The Brain Disease Model Of Addiction. New England Journal Of Medicine, 374, 363-371. Doi:10.1056/NEJMra1511480; Park, B. Y., Et Al. (2016). Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review With Clinical Reports. Behavioral Sciences, 6, 17. Doi:10.3390/Bs6030017; Kalman, T. P. (2008). Kalman, T.P. (2008). Clinical Encounters With Internet Pornography. Journal Of The American Academy Of Psychoanalysis And Dynamic Psychiatry, 36(4) 593-618. Doi:10.1521/Jaap.2008.36.4.593
[5] National Institute On Drug Abuse: The Reward Pathway. (2016). Retrieved From Http://Www.Drugabuse.Gov/Publications/Teaching-Packets/Understanding-Drug-Abuse-Addiction/Section-I/4-Reward-Pathway; Volkow, N. D., & Morales, M. (2015). The Brain On Drugs: From Reward To Addiction. Cell, 162 (8), 712-725. Doi:10.1016/J.Cell.2015.07.046; Pitchers, K. K., Et Al. (2013). Natural And Drug Rewards Act On Common Neural Plasticity Mechanisms With DeltaFosB As A Key Mediator. Journal Of Neuroscience, 33 (8), 3434-3442. Doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4881-12.2013
[6] Berridge, K. C., & Robinson, T. E. (2016). Liking, Wanting, And The Incentive-Sensitization Theory Of Addiction. American Psychologist, 71(8), 670-679. Doi:10.1037/Amp0000059; Berridge, K.C., & Kringelbach, M. L. (2015). Pleasure Systems In The Brain. Neuron, 86, 646-664. Doi:10.1016/J.Neuron.2015.02.018; Paul, P. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, And Our Families. (75) New York: Henry Hold And Co.; Hyman, S. E. (2005). Addiction: A Disease Of Learning And Memory. American Journal Of Psychiatry, 162(8), 1414-1422.
[7] Volkow, N. D., & Morales, M. (2015). The Brain On Drugs: From Reward To Addiction. Cell, 162 (8), 713. Doi:10.1016/J.Cell.2015.07.046
[8] Amis, M. (2001, March 17). A Rough Trade. The Guardian (U.K.), March 17. Retrieved From Https://Www.Theguardian.Com/Books/2001/Mar/17/Society.Martinamis1
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