In porn, everything—from the way people look to the way they have sex—is a fantasy. Porn users often get so obsessed chasing the fantasy that they miss out on actual love and relationships.

Back in the 1950s, two researchers named Tinbergen and Magnus played a trick on butterflies. [1] After figuring out which marks on female butterfly wings were most eye-catching to males, the researchers created their own cardboard butterfly models. They exaggerating the patterns on the wings to make them brighter and flashier than would ever be found in nature. Essentially, they created the world’s first butterfly supermodels.

And the male butterflies fell for it. They went straight for the cardboard mockups and tried to mate with them. Ignoring the real female butterflies that were right there in plain sight, the males gave all their attention to the exaggerated pictures. [2] Sound familiar?

Like the duped butterflies, porn users can get so obsessed chasing flashy fantasies that they miss out on real life and real relationships. Call it the first great lie of porn:

Porn Lie #1
You can have it both ways; you can enjoy the immediate gratification of thousands of virtual sex partners and the long-term satisfaction of a real relationship.

The truth is, porn often takes a heavy toll on real-life relationships. [3] When they discover that their loved-one is using porn, many partners feel shocked, rejected, abandoned, humiliated, and betrayed. [4] (See How Porn Can Hurt Your Partner.) The idea that “porn is a personal decision that affects no one else” is simply wrong.

But even if your partner has no problem with porn, it can still poison your relationship. Studies have clearly shown that porn erodes a person’s ability to love and feel love with a real partner. [5] When men are exposed to porn, they rate themselves as less in love with their actual partners, [6] and less satisfied with their relationships and sex lives. [7] They become more critical and dissatisfied with their partner’s appearance, sexual performance, sexual curiosity, and displays of affection. [8] Ironically, porn is directly related to problems with attraction, arousal, and sexual performance, [9] as well as lower sex drive, erectile dysfunction, and difficulty reaching orgasm. [10] (See How Porn Damages Your Sex Life.)

One recent study examined men who used Internet porn compulsively and found that, in 11 out of 19 subjects, porn use had lowered their sex drive and/or ability to maintain erections in physical relationships with real women. [11] Oddly enough, those men were still able to respond sexually to porn. [12] Like Tinbergen’s butterflies, porn can leave men preferring Internet porn over an actual partner. [13] Chances are, your partner is not okay with that.

Porn Lie #2
Porn is just watching people have sex—what could be more natural and normal than that?

Actually, sex is natural and normal. Porn is something entirely different.

Make no mistake, porn is a product. Pornographers have a lot to gain by driving traffic to their sites, so they dress up their product to grab your attention. That “dressing up” is exactly what makes porn so unnatural.

Professional porn actors have a whole team of people to make every detail look perfect, from directing and filming to lighting and makeup, maybe even a plastic surgeon or two to thank. With some careful editing, a typical 45 minute porn flick that took three days to shoot can appear to have happened all at once, without a break. Film the right bodies from the right angles at the right moments, edit out all the mistakes, Photoshop away any imperfections, add a catchy soundtrack, and you have something most definitely NOT like “natural” sex with “normal” people. You end up with something more “cardboard” than “butterfly.”

Porn Lie #3
Porn is just an innocent distraction and a harmless pastime.

Leading relationship experts, Drs. John and Julie Gottman have expressed serious concern about the effects of pornography on couple relationships. They explain, “Pornography may be just such a supernormal stimulus. With pornography use, much more of a normal stimulus may eventually be needed to achieve the response a supernormal stimulus evokes. In contrast, ordinary levels of the stimulus are no longer interesting. This may be how normal sex becomes much less interesting for porn users. The data supports this conclusion. In fact, use of pornography by one partner leads the couple to have far less sex and ultimately reduces relationship satisfaction.”

Once a person is aware of the damage they are doing to themselves, (See How Porn Changes the Brain) their loved ones (See How Porn Can Hurt Your Partner) , and society (See The Porn Industry’s Dark Secrets), using porn can hardly be called harmless or innocent.

Porn Lie #4
Porn is a safe way to learn about sex.

This lie is especially troubling because many young porn users really do rely on the warped fantasy of porn to form their ideas and expectations about sex. [14] That’s scary for a lot of reasons. Young men who use porn often expect their partners to act out what they’ve seen, even if it’s painful, degrading, or dangerous. [15] They tend to believe that what they see in porn is normal and acceptable, even as their tastes in porn grow more extreme over time. [16] (See How Porn Affects Sexual Tastes.) And as people adopt the unrealistic standards of porn, they end up feeling bad about themselves [17] and dissatisfied with their partners. [18]

Learning about sex from porn also means absorbing a lot of dangerous ideas about sexuality and women. [19] (See How Porn Warps Ideas About Sex.) Amateur porn, which claims to be more natural and real, actually teaches the same attitudes and reproduces the same false stereotypes as professionally produced porn—sometimes worse! [20]

Ultimately, porn doesn’t deliver the satisfaction and healthy enjoyment it promises. [21] It leads to damaged relationships, disappointment, and isolation. [22] (See Why Porn Leaves You Lonely.) Tinbergen’s butterflies were simply reacting to instinct when they were fooled by the supermodel decoys, but humans are not victims of their evolution. You can choose to recognize porn for the deception it is. You can reject porn’s lies and choose real life, real relationships, and real love.

Citations
[1] Magnus, D. B. E. (1958). Experimental analysis of some ‘over-optimal’ sign-stimuli in the mating behavior of the fritillary butterfly. Argynnis paphia. Proceedings of the 10th International Congress on Entomology, 2, 405-418; Tinbergen, N. (1951). The study of instinct. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
[2] Magnus, D. B. E. (1958). Experimental analysis of some ‘over-optimal’ sign-stimuli in the mating behavior of the fritillary butterfly. Argynnis paphia. Proceedings of the 10th International Congress on Entomology, 2, 405-418; Tinbergen, N. (1951). The study of instinct. Oxford: Clarendon Press; Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography addiction—a supranormal stimulus considered in the context of neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3, 20767; Paul, Pamela. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 145.
[3] Minarcik, J., Wetterneck, C. T., & Short, M. B. (2016). The effects of sexually explicit material use on romantic relationship dynamics. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5(4) 700-707. doi: 10.1556/2006.5.2016.078; Park, B. Y., et al. (2016). Is internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysunction? A Review with Clinical Reports, Behavioral Sciences, 6, 17. doi:10.3390/bs6030017; Minarcik, J., Wetterneck, C. T., & Short, M. B. (2016). The effects of sexually explicit material use on romantic relationship dynamics. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5(4) 700-707. doi: 10.1556/2006.5.2016.078; Sun, C., Bridges, A., Johnason, J., Ezzell, M., (2014). Pornography and the Male Sexual Script: An Analysis of Consumption and Sexual Relations. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45, 1-12. doi:10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2; Bergner, R. M., & Bridges, A. J. (2002). The significance of heavy pornography involvement for romantic partners: Research and clinical implications. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 28, 193-206. doi:10.1080/009262302760328235; Schneider, J. P. (2000). Effects of Cybersex Addiction on the Family: Results of a Survey. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 7(1), 31-58. doi:10.1080/10720160008400206;
[4] Kalman, T. P. (2008). Clinical Encounters with Internet Pornography, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 36(4), 593-618. doi:10.1521/jaap.2008.36.4.593; Bridges, A. J., Bergner, R. M., & Hesson-McInnis, M. (2003). Romantic Partners’ Use of Pornography: Its Significance for Women. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 29(1), 1-14. doi:10.1080/713847097; Bergner, R.M., & Bridges, A. J. (2002). The significance of heavy pornography involvement for romantic partners: Research and clinical implications. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 28, 193-206. doi:10.1080/009262302760328235; Schneider, J. P. (2000). Effects of Cybersex Addiction on the Family: Results of a Survey. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 7(1), 31-58. doi:10.1080/10720160008400206;
[5] Park, B. Y., et al. (2016). Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports. Behavioral Sciences, 6, 17. doi:10.3390/bs6030017; Voon, V., et al. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors, PLoS ONE, 9(7), e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419; Kalman, T. P., (2008). Clinical Encounters with Internet Pornography, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 36(4), 593-618. doi:10.1521/jaap.2008.36.4.593; Henline, B. H., Lamke, L. K., & Howard, M. D. (2007). Exploring perceptions of online infidelity. Personal Relationships, 14, 113-128. doi:10.1111/j.1475-6811.2006.00144.x; Stack, S., Wasserman, I., & Kern, R. (2004). Adult social bonds and the use of Internet pornography. Social Science Quarterly, 85, 75-88. doi:10.1111/j.0038-4941.2004.08501006.x; Schneider, J. P. (2000). Effects of cybersex addiction on the family: Results of a survey. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 7, 31-58. doi:10.1080/10720160008400206[9]
[6] Bridges, A. J. (2010). Pornography’s Effect on Interpersonal Relationships. In Stoner, J. & Hughes, D. (Eds.), The Social Cost of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (pp. 89-110). Princeton, NJ: Witherspoon Institute; Kendrick, D., Gutierres, S., & Goldberg, L. (1989). Influence of popular erotica on judgments of strangers and mates. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 25, 159-167. doi:10.1016/0022-1031(89)90010-3
[7] Perry, S. L. (2017) Does Viewing Pornography Reduce Marital Quality Over Time? Evidence from Longitudinal Data. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46(2), 549-559. doi: 10.1007/s10508-016-0770-y; Wery, A., & Billieux, J. (2016). Online sexual activities: An exploratory study of problematic and non-problematic usage patterns in a sample of men. Computers in Human Behavior, 56, 257-266. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.11.046; Minarcik, J., Wetterneck, C. T., & Short, M. B. (2016). The effects of sexually explicit material use on romantic relationship dynamics. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5(4) 700-707. doi: 10.1556/2006.5.2016.078; Poulsen, F. O., Busby, D. M., & Galovan, A. M. (2013). Pornography use: who uses it and how it is associated with couple outcomes. Journal of Sex Research 50(1), 72-83. doi:10.1080/00224499.2011.648027; Morgan, E. M. (2011). Associations between Young Adults’ Use of Sexually Explicit Materials and Their Sexual Preferences, Behaviors, and Satisfaction. Journal of Sex Research, 48(6), 520-530. doi:10.1080/00224499.2010.543960; Maddox, A. M., Rhoades, G. K., & Markman, H. J. (2011). Viewing Sexually-Explicit Materials Alone or Together: Associations with Relationship Quality. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(2), 441-448. doi:10.1007/s10508-009-9585-4; Yucel, D. & Gassanov, M. A. (2010). Exploring actor and partner correlates of sexual satisfaction among married couples. Social Science Research, 39(5), 725-738. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.20009.09,002
[8] Zillmann, D. and Bryant, J. (1988). Pornography’s Impact on Sexual Satisfaction. Journal of Applied Social Psychology 18, 5: 438–53.
[9] Carvalheira, A., Traeen, B., & Stulhofer, A. (2015). Masturbation and Pornography Use Among Coupled Heterosexual Men with Decreased Sexual Desire: How Many Roles of Masturbations? Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 41(6), 626-635. doi:10.1080/0092623X.2014.958790; Voon, V., et al. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors, PLoS ONE, 9(7), e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419; Sun, C., Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2014). Pornography and the Male Sexual Script: An Analysis of Consumption and Sexual Relations. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45(4), 1-12. doi:10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2; Poulsen, F. O., Busby, D. M., & Galovan, A. M. (2013). Pornography use: who uses it and how it is associated with couple outcomes. Journal of Sex Research 50(1), 72-83. doi:10.1080/00224499.2011.648027; Stewart, D. N., & Szymanski, D. M. (2012). Young Adult Women’s Reports of Their Male Romantic Partner’s Pornography Use as a Correlate of Their Self-Esteem, Relationship Quality, and Sexual Satisfaction. Sex Roles, 67(5-6), 257-274. doi:10.1007/s11199-012-0164-0; Maddox, A. M., Rhoades, G. K., & Markman, H. J. (2011). Viewing Sexually-Explicit Materials Alone or Together: Associations with Relationship Quality. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(2), 441-448. doi:10.1007/s10508-009-9585-4; Morgan, E. M. (2011). Associations between young adults’ use of sexually explicit materials and their sexual preferences, behaviors, and satisfaction. Journal of Sex Research, 48,(6), 520-530. 8(6):520-30. doi:10.1080/00224499.2010.543960; Janssen, E., & Bancroft, J. (2007). The Dual-Control Model: The role of sexual inhibition & excitation in sexual arousal and behavior. In Janssen, E. (Ed.), The Psychology of Sex (pp. 197-222). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press; Zillman, D., & Bryant, J. (2006). Pornography’s Impact on Sexual Satisfaction. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18(5), 438-453. doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.1988.tb00027.x
[10] Wery, A., & Billieux, J. (2016). Online sexual activities: An exploratory study of problematic and non-problematic usage patterns in a sample of men. Computers in Human Behavior, 56, 257-266. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.11.046; Sutton, K. S., Stratton, N., Pytyck, J., Kolla, N. J., & Cantor, J. M. (2015). Patient Characteristics by Type of Hypersexuality Referral: A Quantitative Chart Review of 115 Consecutive Male Cases. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 41(6), 563-580. doi:10.1080/0092623X.2014.935539; Carvalheira, A., Traeen, B., & Stulhofer, A. (2015). Masturbation and Pornography Use Among Coupled Heterosexual Men with Decreased Sexual Desire: How Many Roles of Masturbations? Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 41(6), 626-635. doi:10.1080/0092623X.2014.958790; Voon, V., et al. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors, PLoS ONE, 9(7), e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419; Janssen, E., & Bancroft, J. (2007). The Dual-Control Model: The role of sexual inhibition & excitation in sexual arousal and behavior. In Janssen, E. (Ed.), The Psychology of Sex (pp. 197-222). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press;
[11] Voon, V., et al. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors, PLoS ONE, 9(7), e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419
[12] Voon, V., et al. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviors, PLoS ONE, 9(7), e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419
[13] Sun, C., Bridges, A., Johnason, J., & Ezzell, M. (2014). Pornography and the Male Sexual Script: An Analysis of Consumption and Sexual Relations. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45(4), 1-12. doi:10.1007/s10508-014-0391-2; Hilton, D. L. (2013). Pornography addiction—a supranormal stimulus considered in the context of neuroplasticity. Socioaffective Neuroscience & Psychology, 3, 20767. doi:10.3402/snp.v3i0.20767; Kalman, T. P., (2008). Clinical Encounters with Internet Pornography, Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 36(4), 593-618. doi:10.1521/jaap.2008.36.4.593; ; Paul, Pamela. (2007). Pornified: How Pornography Is Transforming Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 145.
[14] Peter, J. & Valkenburg, P. M., (2016) Adolescents and Pornography: A Review of 20 Years of Research. Journal of Sex Research, 53(4-5), 509-531. doi:10.1080/00224499.2016.1143441; Rothman, E. F., Kaczmarsky, C., Burke, N., Jansen, E., & Baughman, A. (2015). “Without Porn…I Wouldn’t Know Half the Things I Know Now”: A Qualitative Study of Pornography Use Among a Sample of Urban, Low-Income, Black and Hispanic Youth. Journal of Sex Research, 52(7), 736-746. doi:10.1080/00224499.2014.960908; Frith, H. (2015). Visualizing the ‘real’ and the ‘fake’: emotion work and the representation of orgasm in pornography and everyday sexual interactions. Journal of Gender Studies, 24(4), 386-398. doi:10.1080/09589236.2014.950556
[15] Rothman, E. F., Kaczmarsky, C., Burke, N., Jansen, E., & Baughman, A. (2015). “Without Porn…I Wouldn’t Know Half the Things I Know Now”: A Qualitative Study of Pornography Use Among a Sample of Urban, Low-Income, Black and Hispanic Youth. Journal of Sex Research, 52(7), 736-746. doi:10.1080/00224499.2014.960908; Layden, M. A. (2010) Pornography and Violence: A New Look at the Research. In Stoner, J. & Hughes, D. (Eds.), The Social Cost of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (pp. 57-68). Princeton, N.J.: Witherspoon Institute; Ryu, E. (2008). Spousal Use of Pornography and Its Clinical Significance for Asian-American Women: Korean Woman as an Illustration. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 16(4), 75. doi:10.1300/J086v16n04_05; Shope, J. H. (2004). When Words Are Not Enough: The Search for the Effect of Pornography on abused Women. Violence Against Women, 10(1), 56-72. doi:10.1177/1077801203256003
[16] Weinberg, M. S., Williams, C. J., Kleiner, S., & Irizarry, Y. (2010). Pornography, normalization and empowerment. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39 (6) 1389-1401. doi:10.1007/s10508-009-9592-5; Doring, N. M. (2009). The Internet’s impact on sexuality: A critical review of 15 years of research. Computers in Human Behavior, 25(5), 1089-1101. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2009.04.003; Zillmann, D. (2000). Influence of Unrestrained Access to Erotica on Adolescents’ and Young Adults’ Dispositions Toward Sexuality. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27, 2: 41–44. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10904205
[17] Steffens, B. A. and Rennie, R. L. (2006). The Traumatic Nature of Disclosure for Wives of Sexual Addicts. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity 13, 2 and 3: 247–67; Wolf, N. (2004). The Porn Myth. New York Magazine, May 24; Wildmom-White, M. L. and Young, J. S. (2002). Family-of-Origin Characteristics Among Women Married to Sexually Addicted Men. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity 9, 4: 263–73.Zillmann, D. (2000). Influence of Unrestrained Access to Erotica on Adolescents’ and Young Adults’ Dispositions Toward Sexuality. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27, 2: 41–44. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10904205
[18] Minarcik, J., Wetterneck, C. T., & Short, M. B. (2016). The effects of sexually explicit material use on romantic relationship dynamics. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 5(4) 700-707. doi: 10.1556/2006.5.2016.078; Morgan, E. M. (2011). Associations between Young Adults’ Use of Sexually Explicit Materials and Their Sexual Preferences, Behaviors, and Satisfaction. Journal of Sex Research, 48(6), 520-530. doi:10.1080/00224499.2010.543960; Maddox, A. M., Rhoades, G. K., & Markman, H. J. (2011). Viewing Sexually-Explicit Materials Alone or Together: Associations with Relationship Quality. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40(2), 441-448. doi:10.1007/s10508-009-9585-4; Yucel, D. & Gassanov, M. A. (2010). Exploring actor and partner correlates of sexual satisfaction among married couples. Social Science Research, 39(5), 725-738. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.20009.09,002
[19] Rothman, E. F., Kaczmarsky, C., Burke, N., Jansen, E., & Baughman, A. (2015). “Without Porn…I Wouldn’t Know Half the Things I Know Now”: A Qualitative Study of Pornography Use Among a Sample of Urban, Low-Income, Black and Hispanic Youth. Journal of Sex Research, 52(7), 736-746. doi:10.1080/00224499.2014.960908; Zillmann, D. (2000). Influence of Unrestrained Access to Erotica on Adolescents’ and Young Adults’ Dispositions Toward Sexuality. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27, 2: 41–44. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10904205; Zillmann, D. and Bryant, J. (1988). Pornography’s impact on sexual satisfaction, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18, 5, 438-53. 10.1111/j.1559-1816.1988.tb00027.x; Zillman, D. & Bryant, J. (1982). Pornography, sexual callousness, and the trivialization of rape. Journal of Communication, 32(4), 10-21.
[20] Frith, H. (2015). Visualizing the ‘real’ and the ‘fake’: emotion work and the representation of orgasm in pornography and everyday sexual interactions. Journal of Gender Studies, 24(4), 386-398. doi:10.1080/09589236.2014.950556; Van Doorn, N. A. J. M. (2010). Keeping it real: User-generated pornography, gender reitification, and visual pleasure. Convergence, 16, 411-430. doi:10.1177/1354856510375144. See also Klassen, M. J. E., & Peter, J. (2015). Gender (In)Equality in Internet Pornography: A Content Analysis of Popular Pornographic Internet Videos. Journal of Sex Research, 52(7), 721-735. doi:10.1080/00224499.2014.976781 (Finding that amateur porn is actually more gender-unequal than professional porn and features more more coerced sex.)
[21] Flisher, C. (2010). Getting Plugged In: An Overview of Internet Addiction. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 46: 557–559. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01879.x; Layden, M. A. (2010). Pornography and Violence: A New look at the Research. In Stoner, J., & Hughes, D. (Eds.) The Social Costs of Pornography: A Collection of Papers (pp. 57–68). Princeton, NJ: Witherspoon Institute; Doidge, N. (2007). The Brain That Changes Itself. New York: Penguin Books; Stack, S., Wasserman, I., & Kern, R. (2004). Adult social bonds and the use of Internet pornography. Social Science Quarterly, 85, 75-88. doi:10.1111/j.0038-4941.2004.08501006.x; Schneider, J. P. (2000). Effects of cybersex addiction on the family: Results of a survey. Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 7, 31-58. doi:10.1080/10720160008400206; Kafka, M. P. (2000). The Paraphilia-Related Disorders: Nonparaphilic Hypersexuality and Sexual Compulsivity/Addiction. In Leiblum, S. R., & Rosen, R. C. (Eds.) Principles and Practice of Sex Therapy, 3rd Ed. (pp. 471–503). New York: Guilford Press.
[22] Park, B. Y., et al. (2016). Is internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunction? A Review with Clinical Reports, Behavioral Sciences, 6, 17. doi:10.3390/bs6030017; Olmstead, S. B., Negash, S., Pasley, K., & Fincham, F. D. (2013). Emerging Adults’ Expectations for Pornography Use in the Context of Future Committed Romantic Relationships. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 42, 625-635. doi:10.1007/s10508-012-9986-7; Mitchell, K. J., Becker-Blease, K. A., & Finkelhor, D. (2005). Inventory of problematic internet experiences encountered in clinical practice. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36, 498-509. doi:10.1037/0735-7028.36.5.498; Yoder, V. C., Virden, T. B., & Amin, K. (2005). Internet Pornogrpahy and Loneliness: An Association? Sexual Addiction and Compulsivity, 12, 19-44. doi:10.1080/10720160590933653; Brooks, G. R., (1995). The centerfold syndrome: How men can overcome objectification and achieve intimacy with women. San Francisco, CA: Bass.

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