It’s no secret that porn has become mainstream entertainment in our society. From popular porn sites putting up billboards in New York City’s Times Square to online news sources like BuzzFeed normalizing porn with viral videos, it feels like porn is everywhere you look. Porn is plastered all over social media sites like Tumblr, and it’s easy to see on Twitter considering the Twitterverse is home to an estimated 10+ million porn accounts.

But not everyone is complaining about porn’s pervasiveness. Check out what a lot of people are saying about porn:

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If only these people knew the facts behind the real harmful effects of porn, we think they’d likely have a different view. The reality is that porn’s harmful effects are no longer unknown. The science and research has been out for years now and thousands of people, including porn stars themselves, have spoken out on how porn has seriously damaged their lives and relationships.

So let’s shed some more light on this issue, specifically the facts.

11 Porn Industry Stats That Really Need To Change:

1. Porn sites receive more regular traffic than Netflix, Amazon, & Twitter combined each month. (HuffPost)

2. 35% of all internet downloads are porn-related. (WebRoot)

3. 34% of internet users have been exposed to unwanted porn via ads, pop-ups, etc. (WebRoot)

4. Porn increased marital infidelity by 300%. (WebRoot)

5. At least 30% of all data transferred across the internet is porn-related. (HuffPost)

6. The most common female role in porn is women in their 20’s portraying teenagers. (Jon Millward.) (In 2013, Millward conducted the largest personal research study on the Porn Industry in the U.S. He interviewed 10,000 porn stars about various aspects of the business.)

7. Recorded child sexual exploitation (known as “child porn”) is one of the fastest-growing online businesses. (IWF)

8. 624,000+ child porn traders have been discovered online in the U.S. (Innocent Justice)

9. Child porn is a $3 billion industry. (TopTenReviews)

10. Porn is a global, estimated $97 billion industry, with about $12 billion of that coming from the U.S. (NBC News)  

11. In 2016 alone, more than 4,599,000,000 hours of porn were watched on the world’s largest porn site. (PH Analytics)

12. Eleven pornography sites are among the world’s top 300 most popular Internet sites. The most popular such site, at number 18, outranks the likes of eBay, MSN, and Netflix. (SimilarWeb)

Viewing Stats That Are Hard To Believe (from NCOSE):

13. 64% of young people, ages 13–24, actively seek out pornography weekly or more often. [1]

14. Teenage girls and young women are significantly more likely to actively seek out porn than women 25 years old and above. [2]

15. A study of 14- to 19-year-olds found that females who watched pornographic videos were at a significantly greater likelihood of being victims of sexual harassment or sexual assault. [3]

16. A Swedish study of 18-year-old males found that frequent users of pornography were significantly more likely to have sold and bought sex than other boys of the same age. [4]

17. A 2015 meta-analysis of 22 studies from seven countries found that internationally the consumption of pornography was significantly associated with increases in verbal and physical aggression, among males and females alike. [5]

18. A recent UK survey found that 44% of males aged 11–16 who viewed pornography reported that online pornography gave them ideas about the type of sex they wanted to try. [6]

What These Numbers Mean

These issues aren’t going away as long as society continues to deny the real, proven harms of porn and a vast majority of people believe the lie that it’s harmless. At one point in time, porn wasn’t a common issue that affected millions of people, much less all of society. It wasn’t a topic that needed to be discussed with such urgency. But now, those days are over.

Porn is a favorite past time for millions of users, and many of them have no idea what kind of harm they’re letting into their own lives, or the kind of exploitation they’re contributing to.

But we can change that. We can raise awareness, and the good news is, these stats are under our control. We hold the power to change these numbers by being educated and decreasing the demand for sexual exploitation. Right now, the porn industry is simply supplying what people are demanding. The only way this changes is if people stop, re-examine reality, get educated about the real harmful effects of porn, and make a change in their lives that doesn’t include porn.

Why This Matters

By stopping the demand for porn, we are putting an end to something that addicts people, destroys relationships, and affects our society as a whole. It’s time to change the stats. Stopping the demand starts here, with us spreading the facts.

You with us?

What YOU Can DO

If you’re not cool with these stats, SHARE this article to make a difference. Get educated on the real harms of porn and take a stand.

Spark Conversations

This movement is all about changing the conversation about pornography. When you rep a tee, you can spark meaningful conversation on porn’s harms and inspire lasting change in individuals’ lives, and our world. Are you in? Check out all our styles in our online store, or click below to shop:

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Citations

[1] Barna Group, The Porn Phenomenon: The Impact of Pornography in the Digital Age, (Ventura, CA: Josh McDowell Ministry, 2016).
[2] Barna Group, “News Conference on Barna’s New Study: ‘The Porn Phenomenon,’” (January 15, 2016), https://www.barna.org/blog/culture-media/barna-group/porn-press-conference#.VrS9OrSJndl 
[3] Silvia Bonino, Silvia Ciairano, Emanuela Rabagliette, and Elena Cattelino, “Use of Pornography and SelfReported Engagement in Sexual Violence among Adolescents,” European Journal of Developmental Psychology 3, no. 3 (2006):265-288.
[4] Carl Göran Svedin, Ingrid Âkerman, and Gisela Priebe, “Frequent Users of Pornography. A Population Based Epidemiological Study of Swedish Male Adolescents,” Journal of Adolescence 34, no. 4 (2011): 779–788. 
[5] Paul J. Wright, Robert S. Tokunaga, and Ashley Kraus, “A Meta-Analysis of Pornography Consumption and Actual Acts of Sexual Aggression in General Population Studies,” Journal of Communication 66, no. 1 (February 2016): 183–205.
[6] Elena Martellozzo et al., “‘I Wasn’t Sure It Was Normal To Watch It . . .’ A Quantitative and Qualitative Examination of the Impact of Online Pornography on the Values, Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviours of Children and Young People,” London: Middlesex University (2016), https://www.mdx.ac.uk/__data/ assets/pdf_file/0021/223266/MDX-NSPCC-OCC-pornography-report.pdf

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