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If You’re Taking the #NoPornovember Challenge, Here are 8 Tips to Quit

If you’re trying to stop watching porn, know that you don’t have to do this alone—we’ve got your back. Here are a few key tips to quit porn.

By October 31, 2022No Comments

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Decades of studies from respected institutions have demonstrated significant impacts of porn consumption on individuals, relationships, and society. No Porn November is all about giving visibility to these facts and empowering individuals to choose to be porn-free. Learn more by clicking here.

Even after recognizing that their porn habit has become problematic, many people still have difficulty quitting porn.

Fight the New Drug is not a recovery resource, we’re an awareness-raising movement that educates on the harmful effects of porn. We acknowledge that many people who follow us have struggled with porn, and we want to encourage those people that there is hope.

If you’re trying to quit, know that you don’t have to do this alone—we’ve got your back. Here are a few key tips to quit porn.

Related: 5 Tips to Help You Stay Strong While You Quit Porn

1. Try therapy

Research suggests that therapy is one of the most effective ways to help people quit porn.

Studies find that problematic porn consumers show a 92% reduction in porn consumption after being treated using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, with an 86% reduction 3 months later, and that 95% of the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy patients were able to manage their symptoms after 12 weeks, with 78% showing sustained recovery after 6 months.Sniewski, L., Farvid, P., & Carter, P. (2018). The assessment and treatment of adult heterosexual men with self-perceived problematic pornography use: A review. Addictive behaviors, 77, 217–224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.10.010Copy  Young K. S. (2013). Treatment outcomes using CBT-IA with Internet-addicted patients. Journal of behavioral addictions, 2(4), 209–215. https://doi.org/10.1556/JBA.2.2013.4.3Copy 

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2. Don’t just quit—replace.

Especially in the beginning, it may feel like quitting porn creates some emptiness in your life, but replacing those unhealthy habits with healthy ones can be super helpful.

Read, try new recipes, start painting—focus on what you can do, not what you can’t.

Related: Tips to Quit: What Sleep, Food, and Exercise Have to Do With Quitting Porn

3. Eat, sleep, and exercise!

Exercise can boost neurogenesis, the formation of new cells, as well as dopamine receptors, which can help heal the brain’s frontal cortex.

By recharging your body with the sleep, fuel, and energy it needs, you’ll be better equipped to deal with stress in healthy ways and feel better physically and emotionally.Copy Chambers R. A. (2013). Adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the pathogenesis of addiction and dual diagnosis disorders. Drug and alcohol dependence, 130(1-3), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.12.005Copy 

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4. Recognize your triggers.

Setbacks often happen when you’re Hungry, Angry, Lonely, or Tired (HALT).

If you’re feeling triggered, find something more productive to distract you. Talk to a friend, take a nap, eat some cereal—whatever it takes to get yourself back into a good headspace and back on track.

Related: What Past Issues Are You Trying to Escape From When You Watch Porn?

5. Spend less time on your phone.

Scrolling through social media at night or turning to your phone whenever you’re bored can easily lead back to porn.

Consider not using your phone late at night, keeping it in a different room while you sleep, setting time limits, or using filtering software.

6. Let go of shame.

Research shows that shame can actually drive people back to unhealthy behaviors rather than motivating sustainable change.

Related: Why You Keep Going Back to Porn After Promising to Quit

Remember: you are not a “bad” person for struggling with this. Be kind to yourself, be patient with your progress, and keep trying.Gilliland, R., South, M., Carpenter, B. N., & Hardy, S. A. (2011). The roles of shame and guilt in hypersexual behavior. Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity, 18(1), 12–29. https://doi.org/10.1080/10720162.2011.551182Copy 

7. Download Fortify

Fortify is a free, science-based recovery platform that actually works. In fact, 90% of users report that Fortify has significantly helped them move toward lasting change.

Related: Want to Quit Porn? Focus on It Less, Experts Say

8. Be patient with your progress.

Recovery is not linear—that’s totally normal. A minor setback does not mean you have failed. Research shows that even quitting porn for a short time can lessen its negative effects.

It’s okay if it takes time. Be kind to yourself, and be patient. Keep fighting!

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