There's a vast amount of research on the harmful effects of pornography, and it's important that this information is accessible to the public. Weekly, we highlight a research study that sheds light on the expanding field of academic resources that showcase porn's harms. These studies cover a wide range of topics, from the sociological implications of pornography to the neurological effects of porn-consumption.


The full study can be accessed here.

Authors: Bradley, J., Rajaram, S.P., Isac, S., Ramesh, B.M.
Published April 2015

Abstract

Despite their large numbers, and important role in the HIV epidemic in India, male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) are a difficult to reach population and little is known about their sexual behaviors. Using data from an integrated behavioral and biological assessment of 684 clients in Bangalore in 2012, we examined factors associated with their reports of having sex with three or more different female sex workers in the last month, and anal sex with sex workers. We included sociodemographic and sexual behavior factors and, for the first time in client studies in India, included data on the use of pornography and sexual enhancement products (SEPs) such as pills, oils, and sprays, in our multivariable analyses of client risk.

Methods

Men were interviewed individually through a structured questionnaire administered by trained workers in Kannada, the local language. The questions focused on sociodemographic data, sexual behavior, condom use, use of pornography, and use of SEPs to enhance sexual pleasure. We first examined the frequency of use of pornography and SEPs and described the men who used them. Then we examined factors associated with two dependent variables that reflect risky behavior: having sex with three or more different FSWs in the past month and the practice of anal sex with sex workers.

 

Results

Younger men, those engaged in the transport business (as truck or bus drivers or helpers), and men who had started sex at a younger age, were more likely to be pornography watchers than other clients, as were men who found female sex workers in public places and by telephone, and who had traveled outside Bangalore in the previous year. Those who had visited more than three sex worker partners in the past month, and had either not used a condom, or had a condom break in the previous month, and those who had had anal sex with an FSW, were also more likely to be pornography watchers; 91 % of those reporting anal sex with an FSW had seen pornography in the previous month, compared to 75 % of those who did not report anal sex with an FSW. Furthermore, almost all those clients who reported anal sex with a man or transsexual in the previous six months (95 %) had watched pornography in the past month, compared to 76 % of those who did not report this practice. Eighty-nine percent of recent SEP users reported pornography use compared to 74 % of non-SEP users.

The full study can be accessed here.

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