Pornography has become more popular than ever before in our digital day and age. We are the first generation to have constant access to a world of information on a device that fits into pockets. With this technological power comes pros and cons. Because porn is now totally affordable, always accessible, and completely anonymous, it has become a mainstream pastime, viewed as a harmless habit.

However, what many people don’t realize is that the link between pornography and violence, usually against women, is inseparable.

Violence And Abuse Are Normalized

Anyone who has ever visited a porn site knows the majority of the scenarios involve women being used, dominated, and taken advantage of. There are countless former porn performers who have spoken out against the industry and shared their unsettling stories of how they were exploited on film and off camera as well. It takes only a little research to find these stories of the industry’s violent nature.

We’ve shared many personal accounts of former porn performers, male and female, that details the abuse they endured during their time in the industry. One ex-porn actress known as Alex shared an especially gut-wrenching account of a particular adult film she starred in:

“[One particular film] was the most brutal, depressing, scary scene that I have ever done. I have tried to block it out from my memory due to the severe abuse that I received during the filming. The [male performer] has a natural hatred towards women, in the sense that he has always been known to be more brutal than ever needed. I agreed to do the scene, thinking it was less beating except a punch in the head. If you noticed, [he] had worn his solid gold ring the entire time and continued to punch me with it. I actually stopped the scene while it was being filmed because I was in too much pain.”

Related: Jessica’s Story – My Life As A Porn Star

While the science and research on the harms of porn are powerful within its own right, these personal stories of real human beings who are treated like animals are especially powerful when exposing the harmful reality of porn.

The question to ask at this point is what is pornography teaching our society that is growing up on a steady diet of porn? With many boys becoming addicted to porn as young as age 12, are their developing brains being taught to make love to women, or to make hate?

Everything Is Not As It Appears

Countless studies show that exposure to porn can begin to desensitize viewers to violence against women and influences them to believe it’s acceptable to repeat what they’ve seen on screen. But it may surprise you that violent porn isn’t the only issue. Researchers have found that even non-violent porn can influence the viewer to use forms of verbal manipulation and alcohol to push women into sex.

This is all easily overlooked considering the popular belief that women in porn do it for the enjoyment. On the contrary, in a lot of cases, many women turn to porn as a last resort or as a result of drug abuse or being victims of rape.

It should be a major red flag that the word itself, pornography, is of dark origins. According to the online Etymology Dictionary, the word pornography comes from the greek word pornographos, meaning “depicting prostitutes.” Porne means “prostitute,” originally “bought, purchased” (probably originating from “female slaves sold for prostitution”), and graphein means “to write” or “to document.” A brothel in ancient Greek was referred to as a porneion. So fast forward to today when we have an entire generation thinking that this material—which by definition is documented prostitution—is so normal and acceptable.

Watch Ran Gavrieli’s powerful TEDx talk where he perfectly explains the problem with porn today and what it has done to our society’s perceptions of sex.

In addition to violence, it’s no secret that pornography tends to ignore the woman’s pleasure and focus strictly on what pleases the man. Viewers can easily overlook this fact because the women in these clips seem to be having a pleasurable time. As long as they look like they enjoy what’s going on, it must be okay, right?

Wrong.

Compare the reactions during a porn clip to the real stories of ex-porn stars who shared what was really happening in the exact same scene. Something clearly isn’t right. And the damage isn’t just being done to the minds of viewers, male and female. In many cases, porn sells the idea that, for women, their pleasure relies strictly on the man’s enjoyment and gives society unrealistic view of what mutually satisfying sex entails.

Real love is sexy and consensual, for both people. Porn is the opposite of that.

What YOU Can Do

Shine a light on the real harms of the porn industry and how real people are used, abused, and exploited for entertainment. SHARE this article to spread the facts.

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